Third Culture Kids (An African Perspective) πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡¬ πŸ‡¬πŸ‡§

Identity, it’s complicated.

A Third Culture Kid is a generic term used to describe a generation of people raised in a culture different from their parents or what’s on their passport. I was born in Uganda and moved to the UK in the early 90’s. Although I visit Uganda frequently, I’ve been educated and spent my life in Britain. I hold a British passport, but I resist identifying myself as British and will always say I’m Ugandan first. Unless I’m in Uganda, where I’m often not really seen as Ugandan, but as British, a Mzungu (Ugandan term for β€˜white person’).

Between cultures

Between cultures is a strange place to be, and in this two-part series, I speak to other Third Culture Kids to explore the similarities and differences in our experiences and share what how it feels to be cultural confused, discovering your race and living everyday across cultures. This is Part 1, focusing on the Third Culture Kid from a Pan-African lens.

The cultural complexity that entangles itself around being a Third Culture Kid is experienced by so many of us who have built our lives around this vague sense of belonging. Sometimes it makes us over-romanticise our heritage, and other times, it makes us highly adaptable with a heightened sense of cultural intelligence and empathy with others.

 Louisa Kiwana – @afroblush and Ruth Muthoni – @Mothonee

Louisa Kiwana – @afroblush and Ruth Muthoni – @Mothonee

 Funmi Ogunlusi – @arinola91, Ruth Muthoni – @Mothone, and Louisa Kiwana – @afroblush

Funmi Ogunlusi – @arinola91, Ruth Muthoni – @Mothone, and Louisa Kiwana – @afroblush

 Tina Tama – @mouthe4t

Tina Tama – @mouthe4t

 Ugochukwu Njoku

Ugochukwu Njoku

 Juliet Segayi – @blackacrylic

Juliet Segayi – @blackacrylic

Thank you, I love and appreciate your comments! 

 
Louisa OlafuyiComment